Resources

Community-managed Natural Farming

Community-Managed Natural Farming (CNF) methods like dry, wet, and live mulching and 365-day multi-layered multiple cropping quickly build soil microbiota and aeration, which improves water percolation, soil water retention, and air-water harvesting. CNF and soil humus increase plant water needs. This reduces water input, improves agricultural water efficiency, and drought-proofs crops without affecting yields.

Initiative of the Andhra Pradesh (AP) Government

The AP government started the Rythu Sadhikara Samstha (RySS) in 2015 to bring six million farmers and six million hectares of land under AP Community-managed Natural Farming (APCNF) by 2030. By 2020–21, over 700,000 farmers and farm workers in 3,730 Gram Panchayats (GPs) participated in the program.

CoreCarbonX impact study of APCNF in six agro-climatic zones

CoreCarbonX has been hired to do a large-scale, comprehensive study in six agro-climatic zones of Andhra Pradesh to confirm and measure how much water and energy can be saved because natural farming uses less water on agricultural farmlands. Control groups of CNF and non-CNF farmers cultivating three major crops in Kharif and Rabi across the following six agro-climatic zones are assessed.

  1. High Altitude Tribal areas of Srikakulam, Vizianagaram, Visakhapatnam, East Godavari districts,
  2. North Coastal Zone of Plains of Srikakulam, Vizianagaram, Visakhapatnam,
  3. Godavari Zone (East Godavari Plains, West Godavari),
  4. Krishna Zone (Krishna, Guntur, Prakasam),
  5. Southern Zone (Chittoor, Kadapa, Nellore),
  6. Scarce Rainfall Zone (Anantapur, Kurnool)

This assessment is followed by district-level natural farming analysis and mapping to improve understanding of the scale of impact of APCNF and provide actionable information about natural farming practices’ social and economic impacts for state-level adaptation planning, targets, and actions. Policymakers, administrators, development partners, and NGOs use this information to plan and execute interventions.

Community-managed Natural Farming saves water and energy consumption

A preliminary pilot study has shown that Community-managed Natural Farming (CNF) has the potential to alleviate the over-extraction of groundwater by decreasing the need for irrigation water and the state’s fiscal burden on power subsidies, thereby achieving the objectives of both water and energy conservation.

The project also involved the assessment of increased market participation from smallholder CNF farmers.

We work on the impact assessment of Community-managed Natural Farming initiatives of various governments. 

 

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Rice farming and methane emissions

During rice farming, the fields are often flooded, creating an ideal environment for the decomposition of organic matter and the subsequent release of methane gas, a greenhouse gas 27 times more potent than carbon dioxide. Global rice production accounts for 8-12% of human generated methane.

Partnership to benefit the farmer community and the environment 

CoreCarbonX(CCX) and Vida Carbon Corp have collaborated on a project that would help the paddy farmer community implement improved water management systems in 100,000 hectares of rice fields in Telangana. 

Farmers in Telangana have no financial incentive to conserve water or energy because both are fully subsidised. CCX plans to address this issue by providing farmers with education on “alternative wetting and drying” techniques. This method of farming makes use of a gauge to show exactly how much water is in various parts of the field. With this equipment, farmers can control the water supply to their crops precisely. Reduced methane emissions can be achieved by limiting the length of time that rice fields are submerged in water. The rate of decomposition of organic material and, consequently, methane emissions will be reduced when rice fields are flooded for shorter periods of time.

Farmers economic gain from carbon credits and other co-benefits

Farmers who take part will reap financial rewards from the project’s success through a share of the money made from selling carbon credits.

Benefits such as these are gained in addition to the accomplishment of six SDGs set by the United Nations:

  • Reduced water consumption by 15%-25%.
  • Increases in Farmer’s Profits.
  • Promote better collaboration between entrepreneurs.
  • Water pump fuel and energy consumption will be reduced.

 

5,400,000

Est. tonnes of CO2 reduced

1,00,000 

Hectares of rice fields supported

2022

Project start date

7-9 years

Project life

Types of Offsets Produced

  • Improved Agricultural Practices
  • Reduction
Registry and Certifications

Sustainable Development goals from Co-benefits

 

We are working with corporations and governments to help farmer communities adopt sustainable farming practices. Join us.

 

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Partnership to benefit the health and livelihoods of rural women

CoreCarbonX and Vida Carbon Corp are working together to help 300,000 households in the Indian state of Odisha switch to clean cooking with the help of improved and very efficient stoves. These cookstoves reduce energy loss and increase heat efficiency.

The World Health Organization estimates that 2.4 billion people in the developing world still cook over open flames or inefficient stoves fueled by environmentally-harmful fuels. Cleaner cooking offers a solution to the dangerous indoor air pollution which is the leading cause of death among women and children in homes.

Partnership to benefit the health and livelihoods of 300,000 households  

CoreCarbonX uses a unique distribution method to reach rural residents in remote regions who now have access to clean cooking. The cookstoves are distributed at a little or no cost. Rural women are made aware of its advantages over open cooking and trained on cookstove operation and its cleaning. The cookstoves are serialized and being tracked to ensure project success and collect user feedback.

This project achieves 9 UN Sustainable Development Goals delivering co-benefits as given below:

  • Improvement in air quality benefits the health of women and kids.
  • Creation of employment opportunities in nearby areas for the distribution, installation, and maintenance of cookstoves
  • Reduced firewood needs lower deforestation and nearby forest degradation.
  • Lessons manual labor for wood gathering, which is largely a woman’s job.

While delivering various co-benefits, this project has a significant geographic reach and is very scalable. 

4,600,000

Est. tonnes of CO2 reduced

3,00,000 

Cookstoves distributed

2022

Project start date

7 years

Project life

Types of Offsets Produced

  • Improved Energy Efficiency
  • Reduction
Registry and Certifications

 

Sustainable Development goals from Co-benefits

 

We are working with corporations and governments to widen the use of clean cooking. Join us.

 

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The refrigeration and air conditioning industries make heavy use of ozone depleting compounds, especially hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs). Global warming potentials (GWPs) for most HCFCs and HFCs utilised in these applications are between 1,000 and 4,000 times higher than that of carbon dioxide. Product and machinery designers should look for GWP alternatives that excel in several areas: energy efficiency, safety, operating costs, and environmental performance (which in most cases is a combination of high energy efficiency, minimal leakage and a low or very low GWP refrigerant).

To encourage emission reduction via the use of low GWP(Global Warming Potential) refrigerant technology and management, the Japanese Ministry of the Environment (MOEJ) launched a program known as the “Initiative on Fluorocarbons Life Cycle Management.” As part of this program, MoEJ in association with the Mitsubishi Research Institute (MRI) have begun a project to evaluate the global refrigeration industry’s current state of affairs and the progress made toward the adoption of low global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants.

MRI collaborated with CoreCarbonX on the research for India

CoreCarbonX, in association with MRI, investigated the state of refrigerant conversion to low-GWP refrigerants in India and the legal and regulatory framework around this transition in light of the Montreal Protocol/Kigali Amendment that were introduced to outline the phasing-out of ozone-depleting refrigerants.

The report explains the current state of the conversion to low-GWP refrigerants, projects developed to phase out HCFCs as well as yearly and projected sales estimates for both refrigerants and air conditioners. These results provide a foundation for future collaboration between India and Japan to reduce the country’s emissions of refrigerants that have high ozone depleting potential (ODP).

We are working with various governments to fight climate change. Join us.

 

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Samoa, a South Pacific archipelago comprising 12 Polynesian islands, signed the UNFCCC in 1992 and has committed to reduce GHG emissions. In this context, Samoa has to submit a high-quality National Communication and Biennial Update Report to the UNFCCC including GHG inventory report.

Changes in the atmosphere’s substance balance, such as greenhouse gas concentration, contribute to climate change. Greenhouse gases absorb infrared, warming the planet. Anthropogenic activities have been affecting greenhouse gas concentrations inducing climate crisis.

GHG inventories help understand GHG sources and causes and reduce their global impact. A GHG inventory quantifies emissions and sinks for a given jurisdictional or organizational boundary.   These inventories, which are updated to reflect changes in GHG accounting, influence emission reduction plans and policies and assess progress over time.  IPCC utilises Global Warming Capacity (GWP) to compare each GHG’s heat-trapping potential to CO2.

Samoa’s government commissioned CoreCarbonX to create a National Inventory Report on the country’s greenhouse gas emissions in compliance with UNFCCC requirements.

This study estimates Samoa’s GHG emissions and sinks from 2010 to 2020 from four sectors: energy, industry, agroforestry, and waste. The report presents emission data by source, sink, and gas.

We are working with various governments to fight climate change. Join us.

 

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Approximately 70 percent of Afghanistan’s total power capacity of 1450 W is imported from the neighbouring countries. The country has limited indigenous sources of electricity. Afghanistan can greatly benefit from making the transition from non renewable energy to relying on renewable energy especially Solar energy.

Under this engagement, Core CarbonX has evaluated solar energy potential from rooftops in the city of Kabul. The study has also evaluated the carbon revenue potential from solar rooftop projects in Afghanistan. 300 Sunny days in a year with abundant free Solar irradiation to generate solar power and strong support from Government makes the country an attractive destination for setting up photovoltaic solar power projects.

Improving Lives:

The contribution of solar energy towards climate change mitigation and environmental stewardships were evaluated and showcased by associated carbon revenue that can help in bringing in potential external finance in the renewable energy sector in Afghanistan. Solar rooftop and grid-connected net-metering projects are encouraged and recommended due to the potential benefits of rooftop area, energy security, and generating clean and green energy.

We are working with various governments to fight climate change. Join us.

 

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Skills Strengthening for Industrial Value Enhancement (STRIVE) project is a Government of India project funded by the World Bank under their Programme-for-Result Financing Instrument that ensures outcome based funding. The objective of this national level project is to improve the relevance and efficiency of Skills training provided through ITI s and apprenticeships.  

Core CarbonX (CCX) team takes pride in assisting the Orissa Government in completing STRIVE project in the state.

STRIVE is divided into four results areas:

a) Improved Performance of Industrial Training Institutes

b) Increased Capacities of State Governments to Support Industrial Training Institutes and Apprenticeship Training

c) Improved Teaching and Learning

d) Improved and Broadened Apprenticeship Training

A total of 49 Indian Technical Institutes (ITI) were considered for the project all over Odisha. CCX measured the labor market performance of project and non-project ITIs disaggregated by gender and social groups. We gathered information of ITI students who are not in employment or have left the employment along with the reasons for the same. While collecting such information, specific reasons that induced unemployment such as- Industry closed because of lockdown, Reverse migration due to Pandemic etc. were also identified. We assessed the impact of the ITI training programs in terms of relevance, effectiveness, efficiency and sustainability. Post the data collection and analysis, insights were drawn and inputs were provided for corrective measures required to be taken in order to improve the employability aspects during and after the ITI trainings. We also assessed ITI graduates satisfaction level related to the type of ITI training attended.

We are working with various governments to enhance the training programs in ITIs. Join us.

 

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Mission: To minimize  plastic  wastage and say no to plastic disposables

The global plastics pollution crisis will only worsen unless everybody across the plastics value chain are made more accountable for the true cost of plastics to nature and people. The new study, Solving Plastic Pollution Through Accountability, finds that too much responsibility for reducing plastics pollution is currently focused on consumers and waste management and efforts will remain insufficient unless action is taken across the entire value chain.

Ways to achieve Transparency and Accountability:

  • The process towards registration, transaction and collection of waste must be implemented and monitored thoroughly.
  • The steps involved at each level is briefed and mindfully designed to eliminate any sort of errors that might scope up.
  • Data Management at all level has to be done and observed based on the mapped objectives.
  • The impact to be achieved, with a significance of a detailed outcome, talks about the success of the project and the process respectively.

We are working to make plastic accountable. Join us.

 

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The project activity helps in estimation of carbon stock present in mangrove forest of Kakinada, East Godavari, Andhra Pradesh using remote sensing.

A large fraction of the mangroves in India was destroyed due to aquaculture and agriculture expansion.

Carbon Stock Estimation:

The focus of this study was to employ spectral signatures and morphological characteristics of mangroves to generate an improved index for separating mangrove vegetation from non-mangrove vegetation classes and to compare the performance of the index with other established vegetation discriminating indices [(e.g. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Simple Ratio (SR)] using LandSat 8 OLI imagery. The latest index developed in this study namely ‘Combined Mangrove Recognition Index (CMRI)’ incorporates outputs from NDVI and NDWI indices in order to assess exclusively the mangrove vegetation using information like greenness and water content (succulence).

We work with governments on carbon stock estimation using remote sensing. Join us.

 

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The project activity helps in estimation of carbon stock present in mangrove forest of Kakinada, East Godavari, Andhra Pradesh.

Carbon Stock Estimation:

A large fraction of the mangroves in India was destroyed due to aquaculture and agriculture expansion.

The project activity was initiated to find out the overall carbon present in Kakinada mangrove area. The study was conducted in Kakinada mangrove forest and the samples were collected from Coringa wildlife sanctuary. The study area map was carried out with the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values of Kakinada forest which shows the high degradation of mangrove in the southeast area on the Kakinada bay and adjacent with a marshy wetland situated at 16.9162N and 82.2027E, 17.0373N and 82.2917E.with the center of 16.9890N and 82.2774E.

The area was mapped with the GIS and the study research was carried out with the help of a mobile application. The study estimated the above level biomass and below level biomass and calculated the total carbon stock present in the Coringa Wildlife Sanctuary.

The project also involved the assessment of livelihood opportunities for fishermen community.

We work with various governments on Carbon Stock assessment to restore Mangroves. Join us.

 

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