Resources

Community-managed Natural Farming

Community-Managed Natural Farming (CNF) methods like dry, wet, and live mulching and 365-day multi-layered multiple cropping quickly build soil microbiota and aeration, which improves water percolation, soil water retention, and air-water harvesting. CNF and soil humus increase plant water needs. This reduces water input, improves agricultural water efficiency, and drought-proofs crops without affecting yields.

Initiative of the Andhra Pradesh (AP) Government

The AP government started the Rythu Sadhikara Samstha (RySS) in 2015 to bring six million farmers and six million hectares of land under AP Community-managed Natural Farming (APCNF) by 2030. By 2020–21, over 700,000 farmers and farm workers in 3,730 Gram Panchayats (GPs) participated in the program.

CoreCarbonX impact study of APCNF in six agro-climatic zones

CoreCarbonX has been hired to do a large-scale, comprehensive study in six agro-climatic zones of Andhra Pradesh to confirm and measure how much water and energy can be saved because natural farming uses less water on agricultural farmlands. Control groups of CNF and non-CNF farmers cultivating three major crops in Kharif and Rabi across the following six agro-climatic zones are assessed.

  1. High Altitude Tribal areas of Srikakulam, Vizianagaram, Visakhapatnam, East Godavari districts,
  2. North Coastal Zone of Plains of Srikakulam, Vizianagaram, Visakhapatnam,
  3. Godavari Zone (East Godavari Plains, West Godavari),
  4. Krishna Zone (Krishna, Guntur, Prakasam),
  5. Southern Zone (Chittoor, Kadapa, Nellore),
  6. Scarce Rainfall Zone (Anantapur, Kurnool)

This assessment is followed by district-level natural farming analysis and mapping to improve understanding of the scale of impact of APCNF and provide actionable information about natural farming practices’ social and economic impacts for state-level adaptation planning, targets, and actions. Policymakers, administrators, development partners, and NGOs use this information to plan and execute interventions.

Community-managed Natural Farming saves water and energy consumption

A preliminary pilot study has shown that Community-managed Natural Farming (CNF) has the potential to alleviate the over-extraction of groundwater by decreasing the need for irrigation water and the state’s fiscal burden on power subsidies, thereby achieving the objectives of both water and energy conservation.

The project also involved the assessment of increased market participation from smallholder CNF farmers.

We work on the impact assessment of Community-managed Natural Farming initiatives of various governments. 

 

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Rice farming and methane emissions

During rice farming, the fields are often flooded, creating an ideal environment for the decomposition of organic matter and the subsequent release of methane gas, a greenhouse gas 27 times more potent than carbon dioxide. Global rice production accounts for 8-12% of human generated methane.

Partnership to benefit the farmer community and the environment 

CoreCarbonX(CCX) and Vida Carbon Corp have collaborated on a project that would help the paddy farmer community implement improved water management systems in 100,000 hectares of rice fields in Telangana. 

Farmers in Telangana have no financial incentive to conserve water or energy because both are fully subsidised. CCX plans to address this issue by providing farmers with education on “alternative wetting and drying” techniques. This method of farming makes use of a gauge to show exactly how much water is in various parts of the field. With this equipment, farmers can control the water supply to their crops precisely. Reduced methane emissions can be achieved by limiting the length of time that rice fields are submerged in water. The rate of decomposition of organic material and, consequently, methane emissions will be reduced when rice fields are flooded for shorter periods of time.

Farmers economic gain from carbon credits and other co-benefits

Farmers who take part will reap financial rewards from the project’s success through a share of the money made from selling carbon credits.

Benefits such as these are gained in addition to the accomplishment of six SDGs set by the United Nations:

  • Reduced water consumption by 15%-25%.
  • Increases in Farmer’s Profits.
  • Promote better collaboration between entrepreneurs.
  • Water pump fuel and energy consumption will be reduced.

 

5,400,000

Est. tonnes of CO2 reduced

1,00,000 

Hectares of rice fields supported

2022

Project start date

7-9 years

Project life

Types of Offsets Produced

  • Improved Agricultural Practices
  • Reduction
Registry and Certifications

Sustainable Development goals from Co-benefits

 

We are working with corporations and governments to help farmer communities adopt sustainable farming practices. Join us.

 

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Partnership to benefit the health and livelihoods of rural women

CoreCarbonX and Vida Carbon Corp are working together to help 300,000 households in the Indian state of Odisha switch to clean cooking with the help of improved and very efficient stoves. These cookstoves reduce energy loss and increase heat efficiency.

The World Health Organization estimates that 2.4 billion people in the developing world still cook over open flames or inefficient stoves fueled by environmentally-harmful fuels. Cleaner cooking offers a solution to the dangerous indoor air pollution which is the leading cause of death among women and children in homes.

Partnership to benefit the health and livelihoods of 300,000 households  

CoreCarbonX uses a unique distribution method to reach rural residents in remote regions who now have access to clean cooking. The cookstoves are distributed at a little or no cost. Rural women are made aware of its advantages over open cooking and trained on cookstove operation and its cleaning. The cookstoves are serialized and being tracked to ensure project success and collect user feedback.

This project achieves 9 UN Sustainable Development Goals delivering co-benefits as given below:

  • Improvement in air quality benefits the health of women and kids.
  • Creation of employment opportunities in nearby areas for the distribution, installation, and maintenance of cookstoves
  • Reduced firewood needs lower deforestation and nearby forest degradation.
  • Lessons manual labor for wood gathering, which is largely a woman’s job.

While delivering various co-benefits, this project has a significant geographic reach and is very scalable. 

4,600,000

Est. tonnes of CO2 reduced

3,00,000 

Cookstoves distributed

2022

Project start date

7 years

Project life

Types of Offsets Produced

  • Improved Energy Efficiency
  • Reduction
Registry and Certifications

 

Sustainable Development goals from Co-benefits

 

We are working with corporations and governments to widen the use of clean cooking. Join us.

 

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The refrigeration and air conditioning industries make heavy use of ozone depleting compounds, especially hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs). Global warming potentials (GWPs) for most HCFCs and HFCs utilised in these applications are between 1,000 and 4,000 times higher than that of carbon dioxide. Product and machinery designers should look for GWP alternatives that excel in several areas: energy efficiency, safety, operating costs, and environmental performance (which in most cases is a combination of high energy efficiency, minimal leakage and a low or very low GWP refrigerant).

To encourage emission reduction via the use of low GWP(Global Warming Potential) refrigerant technology and management, the Japanese Ministry of the Environment (MOEJ) launched a program known as the “Initiative on Fluorocarbons Life Cycle Management.” As part of this program, MoEJ in association with the Mitsubishi Research Institute (MRI) have begun a project to evaluate the global refrigeration industry’s current state of affairs and the progress made toward the adoption of low global warming potential (GWP) refrigerants.

MRI collaborated with CoreCarbonX on the research for India

CoreCarbonX, in association with MRI, investigated the state of refrigerant conversion to low-GWP refrigerants in India and the legal and regulatory framework around this transition in light of the Montreal Protocol/Kigali Amendment that were introduced to outline the phasing-out of ozone-depleting refrigerants.

The report explains the current state of the conversion to low-GWP refrigerants, projects developed to phase out HCFCs as well as yearly and projected sales estimates for both refrigerants and air conditioners. These results provide a foundation for future collaboration between India and Japan to reduce the country’s emissions of refrigerants that have high ozone depleting potential (ODP).

We are working with various governments to fight climate change. Join us.

 

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Approximately 70 percent of Afghanistan’s total power capacity of 1450 W is imported from the neighbouring countries. The country has limited indigenous sources of electricity. Afghanistan can greatly benefit from making the transition from non renewable energy to relying on renewable energy especially Solar energy.

Under this engagement, Core CarbonX has evaluated solar energy potential from rooftops in the city of Kabul. The study has also evaluated the carbon revenue potential from solar rooftop projects in Afghanistan. 300 Sunny days in a year with abundant free Solar irradiation to generate solar power and strong support from Government makes the country an attractive destination for setting up photovoltaic solar power projects.

Improving Lives:

The contribution of solar energy towards climate change mitigation and environmental stewardships were evaluated and showcased by associated carbon revenue that can help in bringing in potential external finance in the renewable energy sector in Afghanistan. Solar rooftop and grid-connected net-metering projects are encouraged and recommended due to the potential benefits of rooftop area, energy security, and generating clean and green energy.

We are working with various governments to fight climate change. Join us.

 

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The project objective was to carry out data collection and analysis for implementation of the field level Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment and Disaster Preparedness and Response (DPR)  program based on identification of project measures vis-a-vis climate projections and adaptation needs.

Key outcomes of the project were – Collection of Primary and Secondary data; Collection and assessment of baseline line data for the watersheds study with respect to climate (Mainly Rainfall and temperature and extreme weather events) ; Climate Analysis and Modelling; Data analysis of socio economic condition ; Data analysis of area, production, productivity of major crops (Irrigated and Rain fed) in the watershed; Study and analysis of farm level data in the watershed; Conducting vulnerability assessment of the watershed area and suggesting climate change adaptation measures; DPR preparation facilitation; Conducting FGDs(Focus Group Discussions) and PRAs(Participatory Rural Appraisal) for local rural community.

We are working with various state governments on Climate Proofing of Watersheds. Join us.

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Paddy fields are the most dominant anthropogenic sources of methane to the atmosphere (5-20% of the total emission from all anthropogenic sources).

Anaerobic decomposition of organic material in flooded rice fields produces methane, which escapes to the atmosphere primarily by transport through the rice plants.

Water Management and Reduction in CH4 emissions:

Core CarbonX (CCX) is working together with farmers in reducing the methane emissions from Paddy fields. CCX has already implemented a project on 1800 acres of land in the Nalgonda district in Telangana State, India.

The project promotes the Alternate Wetting and Drying (AWD) method that helps water management in the rice field, thereby, increasing the yield of the paddy and reducing methane emissions. In addition, this project benefits the farmers by supporting additional revenue from the carbon market for sustainable rice cultivation.

We are working with various state governments, institutions, NGOs and farmers. Our aim is to implement the AWD method in paddy fields totalling 1 million hectares by 2025.

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CCX project assess the situation of women in project districts and establish benchmark / baseline indicators that have a bearing with clear monitoring and evaluation plan and form a platform for impact evaluation.

In 2016, CARE India Women centred ICS adoption model was pilot tested by CARE India Solutions for Sustainable Development (CISSD) in 3 districts across Odisha and Chhattisgarh. The project sought to promote sustainable adoption of Improved Cook Stoves (ICS) as a clean cooking energy solution among forest-dependent households in Chhattisgarh and Odisha. In other words, this project seeks to increase the adoption of sustainable lifestyles among Forest Dwelling Households (FDHs) in the Indian State of Odisha and Chhattisgarh.

Assessing the impact

The study established a baseline against which the project intended to measure its performance for different indicators, which are in line with the project log frame. The project also looked at contributing to the women empowerment process through Improved Cook Stoves (ICS) ‘Intervention’.

We are working with both government and non-government organisations to enhance the usage of improved cookstoves.

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CCX project on conservation and development of Mangrove at Ennore creek helped to increase the resilience to climate change and improve livelihoods through adaptive co-management of mangroves and associated ecosystems.

Mangroves are threatened as a result of increasing coastal population, settlements and Industries, unsustainable coastal development and land-based activities. The combination of these with natural forces have impelled climate change impacts. Out of ignorance of their immeasurable values, mangroves are being damaged, and are also treated as some waste reservoirs.

Improving Lives

  • Waste Management and Pollution Control
  • Setting up Mangrove Nurseries
  • Creating livelihoods for local communities

Restoring Livelihood

While it meant conservation of Mangroves, the restoration also helps in enhancing the livelihoods of the coastal communities at various levels leading to economic growth. A platform for carbon ecosystem conservation, restoration and scientific research and development known as Ennore Mangrove Forum has also been established.

We are working with governments to restore the ecosystem of Mangroves. Join us.

 

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Climate change is emerging as a threat to agriculture, food security and livelihoods of the farmers and dependent communities in Bhutan. The issues related to climate change and its impact on agriculture are complex and require a comprehensive understanding.

Bhutan, being one of the smallest countries whose economy is majorly based on agriculture, livestock and forests, is particularly vulnerable to climate change due to its topography. There will be an increased likelihood of a potent threat to agriculture in general and food security in particular.

Assessing Risks

The CCX study helps to demonstrate a methodology to assess and map the composite climate risk of agriculture to climate variability and changes in Bhutan.

Adapting to Climate Change

The negative effects of climate change can be mitigated by developing some adaptation measures. While Technology is the primary driver, for overall climate change adaptation, awareness and capacity building among all stakeholders, from farmers to policymakers, are critical.

We are working with governments to assess the impacts of climate change. Join us.

 

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